Department of Health reply to my email to Jeremy Hunt 2/7/15 on the #gpboundaryscam

17/07/2015

I received the following from the Department of Health on 15/7/15, in reply to my email to Jeremy Hunter earlier this month:

Our ref: DE00000945045

Dear Dr Farrelly,

Thank you for your further correspondence of 2 July to Jeremy Hunt, Jane Ellison and Alistair Burt about GP services. I have been asked to reply.

I was sorry to read that you are not satisfied with the Department’s response of 29 June to your previous email (our ref: DE00000940960). I note your continuing concerns about patients registering with GPs outside of traditional practice boundaries.

As stated in my colleague’s previous reply, NHS England will continue to review this policy to ensure that it is meets the needs of the patients who are using the service and who may wish to use it. In addition, it will address the operational issues that have arisen since the introduction of the agreement to ensure that the system remains functional for GP practices.

I note that you have not yet received a response to your correspondence to NHS England, but, as it is responsible for primary care in England, I can only suggest that you continue to raise your concerns with it.

I am sorry I cannot be more directly helpful.
Yours sincerely,

[name removed]
Ministerial Correspondence and Public Enquiries
Department of Health

————————————————————————————————————————-

Please do not reply to this email. To contact the Department of Health, please visit the ‘Contact DH’ section on the GOV.UK website.

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Of course, this is not a true reply, just another text masquerading as a reply.

Scoundrels.


The Department of Health’s response to my last email to Jeremy Hunt about #gpboundaryscam

02/07/2015

Our ref: DE00000940960

Dear Dr Farrelly,

Thank you for your further correspondence of 14 June to Jeremy Hunt, Jane Ellison and Alistair Burt about GP services. I have been asked to reply.

I appreciate your ongoing concerns. As you know, the GP contract agreement for 2014/15 allows GP practices to register new patients from outside their traditional boundary areas without a duty to provide home visits for such patients, as they previously had to.

This arrangement is designed to make the system more flexible and give patients greater freedom in choosing a suitable GP practice – for example, commuters may wish to register with a practice close to their workplace, as opposed to where they live, and people who move house may wish to continue to attend their existing practice.

The agreement was introduced in January and there are currently over 14,000 patients registered with practices away from their home since. All NHS England regional teams have arrangements in place to ensure that those patients are able to access services should they require primary medical care whilst at home.

Those arrangements vary across the country. Many regions commission the national enhanced service model, while some use the local out-of-hours services, and others commission a range of services. However, all have ensured that, should the patients registered in their area require care, they are able to provide it.

To date, NHS England has received no patient complaints or concerns about this matter through its customer contact centre or operational teams in the regions. However, it is aware of some concerns from GP practices about registration and operational issues that it has worked with them to resolve.

NHS England will continue to review this policy to ensure that it is meets the needs of the patients who are using the service and who may wish to use it. In addition, it will address the operational issues that have arisen since the introduction of the agreement to ensure that the system remains functional for GP practices.

I am sorry I cannot be more directly helpful.

Yours sincerely,

[name removed to protect the innocent]

Ministerial Correspondence and Public Enquiries
Department of Health

Please do not reply to this email

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For my next email to Jeremy Hunt and comments on this response

 


I smell a rat. Is Monitor working in the interests of patients or free market healthcare?

27/10/2013

I recently set up a Google news alert for articles on GP practice boundaries.

It threw this article up this morning.

“Monitor senior policy adviser Paul Dinkin, the man heading its primary care consultation, said his initial conclusion was that Monitor would play a major part in primary care.”

“Mr Dinkin said his review was looking at barriers to entry into general practice, such as practice boundaries and registered lists.”

“He said the BMA and the RCGP were wrong to say general practice needed more funding. ‘Our suspicion is not more money for the current model, but to rethink who does what.'”

And my suspicion is that Mr Dinkin does not know a great deal about the ecology of general practice, and that he has little interest in finding out.

Checking on the Monitor website, I found a Call for evidence on general practice services sector in England.  Issued on 1 July 2013, deadline for responses 1 August 2013. So I won’t be offering my views.

Who is Paul Dinkin and what is his background? I could find precious little online. Even on Monitor’s website there is no information.

Can we have some transparency, please?


My second email to Jeremy Hunt on the fraudulent GP practice boundary policy

13/10/2013

Dear Jeremy Hunt,

I sent you an email on 8/9/13 raising concerns about a Government policy. I received a ‘reply’ from a Department of Health official (for my original email and the reply, see below). A first year GCSE student would have no trouble seeing that this is no reply at all: it is a bland, seemingly innocuous, description of the ‘pilot’ into general practice without boundaries. It does not address my concerns at all (1).

I ended my first email with a quote from my submission of May 2013 to the Health Select Committee:

I am making what is a serious and unsettling charge. The people involved in promoting this policy (ministers from both Labour and Conservative parties, and policy makers at the Department of Health) are trying to implement a policy which by its very design will cause primary care services to malfunction and cause real harm. These people have not done an honest risk assessment. They have promoted the policy in a very biased and misleading way. The result is that they have misled Parliament, journalists, and the citizens of England. If this policy were a financial product, it would be deemed mis-selling. In some senses, it is fraudulent (2).

The DH reply only reinforces my hypothesis that this policy is a scam, a deception, a confidence trick.

*

I have been following the development of this policy for over 3 years now. I have not been able to find an example, a metaphor, which would help people to understand the sheer stupidity of this policy. And then last week I came across a news item that I think is of help. Briefly, it is this: a British entrepreneur was convicted in April 2013 for fraud; his fraud was selling bogus bomb detectors to the Iraqi government. He made a lot of money; the bomb detectors did not work; innocent people were blown up; these bogus devices are apparently still being used in Iraq to ‘protect’ the citizens.(3)

I believe this story, this parable, offers a structure that helps make sense of the policy which you, as Secretary of State for Health, have inherited. There is a product, a technology, which is said to perform a function (detect bombs, avoid disasters); the technology is marketed (presumably there was promotional material; presumably it came in a box with reassuring messages on the box); the buyer is persuaded to pay for the technology; the technology is put to use; the technology does not work.

(This sad, shocking story raises a number of questions which I will not address here; but one question is this: why did they not test the device? Presumably the entrepreneur and his firm told the buyers that it had been tested, perhaps they said the device was already being used in other war zones).

Now let us come back to the policy of abolishing GP practice boundaries. British general practice is a complex technology which by its very nature is local, geographically based. Our experience has been that when people move away from the practice area it is no longer possible to look after them properly, especially if they are unwell. So when I heard politicians saying that boundaries were old fashioned and limited choice I was bewildered. I heard Andy Burnham say that this policy would transform the NHS from ‘good; to ‘great’, that poorer patients would be able to take advantage of services that were offered to richer patients; I heard them say that this policy would promote competition and that this would drive up quality. Most of what I heard was very foolish, it did not make any sense, it was nonsensical, it would simply not work, it would not deliver what they were promising, it would actually undermine our work.

Now just in case you think I am some sort of eccentric, some nutty GP who has an absurd bee in his bonnet, ask yourself this: why did the former GPC Chairman Laurence Buckman describe this policy as ‘bonkers’? And why did the annual LMC conference in 2011 vote unanimously (something unheard of) a motion urging the GPC to resist this policy ‘staunchly’?

So, Mr Hunt, what I am saying is this: the technology your Government are proposing simply does not work. Your predecessors, the various promoters of this policy (politicians, the Department of Health, aided by compliant journalists and think tanks) have presented the public with an attractive box, with catchy packaging, which promises a great technology. But the device in the box is bogus, it does not actually work. Just like the bogus bomb detector. They have done no honest testing of the technology in the box. You pretend to test it, as with the sham pilot and the questionable ‘evaluation’ (4).

You see, Mr Hunt, I understand the technology. This is my area of expertise. And I am saying that the technology that your Government is promoting is very faulty and it will not deliver what you are promising. Either you are all remarkably stupid or you are perpetrating a fraud.

The entrepreneur who committed the bogus bomb detector fraud has been arrested, charged, convicted, and sent to prison for his fraud (but not, apparently, for the harm he has caused to a large number of people).

If I am correct in my hypothesis that the Department of Health and ministers are engaged in a deception, a fraud, then should they be charged? And if not, why not?

So what do I propose? I propose that the Health Select Committee open the box and scrutinise the contents carefully, honestly, dispassionately. But are they capable of doing this? I am sceptical. When the Chairman of the Health Select Committee, Stephen Dorrell, was phoned by a Pulse journalist following my submission in May, he said he was broadly in favour of the policy: ‘Where there is choice different people will have different ways of solving the problem and provided that they are all consistent with the commitment to universal delivery of high quality care then I think that the [option] which allows people to consider different ways of solving shared problems is in the interests of all patients.’ (5) This is typical of the rhetoric that is used when discussing this issue; the word ‘choice’ is inevitably used, ‘high quality’, ‘interests of all patients’. But it means nothing. It is all packaging, spin. It does not address the technical problems at all. Mr Dorrell needs to open the box and look at the technology inside the box, not to approvingly describe the packaging.

There is of course another very important question here that I feel, as a professional and as a citizen, needs to be addressed. What is wrong with the system that we have come to this? How is it that policy has been allowed to develop in this way? This is not just a ‘blunder’.

So perhaps it would be better for an independent body to look at what is in the box.

I would also propose that journalists wake up. Look inside the box, ask if it really performs the functions that the promotional material claims (but, for heavens sake, do not use the DH as your source of information). Ask questions; educate yourselves, try to understand the ecology of UK general practice. If any of you are interested, I would be happy to take you through the issues in plain English. Who knows, there might be an Orwell Prize at the end of it all.

Mr Hunt, you have a real problem here. If you implement this technology the problems will become apparent, the design faults will be exposed. You will no longer be able to fall back on the attractive box and the glossy promotional material. You will not be able to say you were not warned.

In the end, Mr Hunt, you cannot get away from this reality, eloquently stated by Richard Feynman: ‘For a successful technology, reality must take precedence over public relations, for nature cannot be fooled.’

Yours sincerely,

George Farrelly

The Tredegar Practice
35 St Stephens Road
London E3 5JD

Notes:

1. The reply from the DH: for reply & my comment; for my first email to Jeremy Hunt
2. For my Submission to the Health Select Committee
3. Bogus bomb detector fraud
4. Questionable ‘evaluation’ of pilot
5. Pulse article ‘MPs to investigate GP practice boundaries’; I do not think they have actually investigated this issue. Nobody has called me, I have not seen it mentioned in the announcements from the Health Select Committee.


12. How can they be so stupid? Brain damage

05/06/2012

While on holiday recently I read a book on the neuroscience of pleasure (David Linden, The Compass of Pleasure). The idea came to me that in some sense the policy to abolish practice boundaries and extend patient choice is actually ‘brain damaged’.

In this sense: the book discusses the way in which various pleasures (sex, certain foods, drugs, behaviours like gambling) activate discrete parts of our brains, which we then experience as pleasurable. The author highlights situations where, under the influence of certain pleasurable experiences (such as falling in love) there is a distortion of our critical faculties, a ‘deactivation of the prefontal cortex’, the judgement, planning, and evaluation centre. Money, cocaine, heroin activate these pleasure centres.

It occurred to me that possibly the thought of choice, the promise of choice, somehow activated the pleasure centres, and led to a deactivation of the prefrontal cortex, a distortion of our critical faculties.

This is perhaps just a metaphor. But it certainly seems to me that certain policies from the DOH appear to be ‘brain damaged’, that is to say that important thinking steps are simply left out.


8. How can they be so stupid? Duplicity

05/06/2012

Duplicity:Oxford Dictionary of English: deceitfulness; archaic the state of being double.

Andrew Lansley gave a speech to the Royal College of General Practitioners’ annual conference in October 2011. I did not attend but fortunately the speech is available on video, as are the questions and answers after the speech. So I was able to listen to these. What he had to say about GP boundaries was actually not unreasonable, he seemed to have understood the problem (‘Now I’m clear that whatever we do general practice must always remain rooted in local communities and that clinical commissioning builds on this.’; whatever was done had to work, they had to find ways that worked; ‘I’m not abolishing practice boundaries…’). But I was sceptical: let’s see what happens. A few weeks later the GPC signed a contract for 2012-13 which agreed to a pilot on GP practice boundaries, and for asking practices to create ‘outer practice boundaries’ which retained patients who moved from within the practice boundaries. This was not unreasonable, but I remained sceptical: how independent and probing would the ‘independent evaluation’ of the pilot be?

Then came the launch of the pilot, at the end of December 2011:

It allows patients for the first time to choose whether to register with a practice close to their workplace or home, without worrying about practice boundaries.

Health Secretary Andrew Lansley said:

‘Many patients are happy with their local GP practice, but a significant minority have problems registering with a practice of their choice. This pilot will mean patients taking part can access the high quality care they deserve in a place and at a time that suits them.

‘That’s why I believe patients should have the freedom to choose a GP practice that suits their lives, and not be restricted by geographical boundaries.’

He did not really believe what he said to the GPs in October. He was intelligent enough to know what sort of thing he had to say in order not to be eaten alive, but his intention was, and still is, to plough ahead with the abolition of practice boundaries. And this is how it was reported in the press.

In this sense, he is duplicitous, ‘double’, speaks with ‘a forked tongue’. Not to be trusted.

(For text of what he said to RCGP)


6. How can they be so stupid? Stupidity-to different degrees, at times grotesque

05/06/2012

The Oxford Dictionary of English has next to nothing for stupidity. For ‘stupid’: lacking intelligence or common sense; dazed and unable to think clearly: apprehension was numbing her brain and making her stupid

lacking intelligence: yes, this is relevant

lacking common sense: yes, definitely

dazed: they should be

unable to think clearly: yes, many examples of this

 


3. If it is so stupid, why are they doing it?

05/06/2012

I have reflected for over 2 years about this. If the proposal to allow patients to register with any GP in England, regardless of where they live, is so stupid, how is it that all three main political parties back the proposal, the Department of Health backs the proposal, journalists do not question the mechanics behind it, and, in the ‘Consultation’ over three quarters of the members of the public who responded allegedly backed the proposal?

I would say there are a variety of reasons, but all in the end come down to a misunderstanding of the situation, of the facts. This misunderstanding is the result of:

Naivety

Ignorance (wilful and unwilful)

Stupidity (to different degrees, reaching at times the grotesque)

Misinformation (wilful and unwilful)

Deception

Duplicity

Being duped

Wishful thinking

Cognitive muddle

Brain damage

Corporate lobbying?

‘The Plot Against the NHS’

Bad Faith (a future post)

(other suggestions welcome)


1. This really has to stop

05/06/2012

For over 2 years now most mornings I wake up earlier than I need to and my mind fixes on the issue of GP practice boundaries and, in one form or another, I think ‘How can they be so stupid?’ ‘They’ being the politicians, the Department of Health, journalists, think tanks, patient representatives. I don’t on the whole include members of the public, simple citizens in this. Because they are being fed stuff by the politicians, journalists, think tanks, and who could blame them for thinking it is reliable stuff?

Why am I doing this? Why am I writing this early on a Bank Holiday morning when I could be in bed sleeping, reading a book, gardening, or going to work to try to catch up on the massive backlog (which I will do later on as it happens)?

I came to medicine late, I was about 6 years older than my peers at medical school. I made a positive choice to become a general practitioner, because I welcomed the chance of working in a community, with families, over time. My wife and I started in our practice in Tower Hamlets 21 years ago. We, and our colleagues in the practice, try to provide a good service to our patients, and to create a healthy environment in which to work.

We, like all GPs, have a geographical practice boundary. To register with us you need to live within that geographical area, if you move outside that area you have to find another GP in whose practice area you live. It seems harsh, but there are a number of practical reasons for it. What I tell patients when they move is simply this: it is important that you be able to get to the surgery easily or for us to get to you easily if you are sick. (There are a raft of reasons why this, from a practical point of view, is necessary). Patients nearly always see why this is necessary.

We have quite a lot of experience of looking after patients who have moved out of the area and not told us. They have continued to use us as their GPs but it simply does not work properly, for a variety of reasons (in some cases it is unsafe, and can be fatal). So we are pretty firm with people on this score, but give them adequate time to find a new GP.

There is another aspect to this question. We work in Bow. We have a limit to how many people we can look after; if we exceed this capacity, the quality of the service we offer declines and the dynamics within the organisation become unhealthy. So we have an upper limit of the number of patients we will register. So if a patient moves away from Bow (to say Brixton), that patient’s place is then taken by another resident of Bow who wants to join us.

So when, in September 2009, I heard that Andy Burnham wanted to abolish GP practice boundaries and give people ‘real choice’, I thought: ‘How can that man be so stupid?’

Then there was the ‘Consultation’ in March 2010; the General Election which brought us the Coalition Government and Andrew Lansley; Andrew Lansley’s vision to bring everyone more choice, and his commitment to abolishing practice boundaries.

But the trouble for me was that I actually worked in the field that they were talking about, and I had daily reminders about the fact that general practice is a community based technology tied to geography, and that to severe its tie to geography simply did not make sense. It simply did not add up. There was a cognitive disconnect.

And so I woke up early asking the question, ‘How can they be so stupid?’ And having followed this issue over the past 2 years, I am still waking with this question, in fact it is seeming to me to be more and more stupid.

But it really has to stop.

 


East London LMCs advise boycotting ‘Choose Your GP’ pilot

21/04/2012

Pulse has published an article on this, together with the letter.

My comment to the Pulse article:

Congratulations to the East London LMCs for taking this necessary step. Not only will the commuters using local GP practices be using local resources in terms of secondary care, community services, and prescribing costs, but do local practices really have the capacity to look after these additional patients without distracting them from their local registered populations?

PCT clusters throughout England are having to put in place contingency plans to look after patients who register at one of these pilot sites, but who then fall ill at home and need a GP. What is the cost of all of this? Where is this money coming from?

At all sorts of levels this is a crackpot policy. Either Lansley and the secret agents at the Department of Health are remarkably stupid, or, more likely, this policy is actually a smokescreen to de-regulate English general practice. Removing practice boundaries will open up general practice to an entirely different model which will be ‘liberating’ for organisations like Virgin Care, but will undermine British general practice.

They call this a pilot and they say that it will be ‘independently’ evaluated. I predict that as with other piloted policies, that plans to implement the nationwide roll-out will be made before the (sanitised?) evaluation is made public.

I believe it is possible to stop this policy, but this will require persistent clear-headed resistance to the impracticalities & inefficiencies that will inevitably be proposed. A light needs to be shone on this policy: why did none of the 3 political parties carry out a proper risk assessment of this policy? Why did the Department of Health avoid almost any mention of these risks in the so-call ‘Consultation’ two years ago?

It is really just a confidence trick, and the choice it promises is an illusion. The GP you’ve heard such good things about is actually working at full capacity already. The well-functioning practice you may have heard about works well with this population size, within this geographical area. Increase the list size, change the geography, and the system changes.

For more on this, see my blog www.onegpprotest.org